sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)
See more sawfly larvae images in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants. 

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six. 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

See more sawfly larvae images in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants.

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

Sawfly Larvae

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

The Sign of the Sawfly
Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

See more sawfly larvae images in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants. 

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six. 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

The Sign of the Sawfly

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

See more sawfly larvae images in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants.

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae Ballet
Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera) 

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants. 

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six. Although often easily confused, if you see them in this characteristic tails-up S-shaped posture, there is little mistaking them. 

This is not a studio shot. The red background is a red dirt embankment, very typical of the Pu’er region.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Sawfly Larvae Ballet

Sawfly Larvae (Symphyta, Hymenoptera)

Sawfly is the common name for insects belonging to suborder Symphyta of the order Hymenoptera (wasps, hornets, bees and ants). Adult sawflies are wasp-like in appearance but are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax, and by their caterpillar-like larvae. The common name comes from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which the females use to cut into the plants where they lay their eggs. Large populations of certain sawfly species can cause substantial economic damage to forests and cultivated plants.

Sawfly larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have six or more pairs of prolegs on the abdomen (caterpillars have five or fewer), and (2) they have two stemmata (simple eyes) instead of a caterpillar’s six. Although often easily confused, if you see them in this characteristic tails-up S-shaped posture, there is little mistaking them.

This is not a studio shot. The red background is a red dirt embankment, very typical of the Pu’er region.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

Via
Canon PowerShot A590 IS
igowherethetreesare:

The larvae of the Birch Sawfly, Arge pectoralis, chowing down on a leaf. Not to be confused with the Dusky Birch Sawfly, of course- their heads are black, while the Birch Sawfly has a reddish head and distinctly black legs.

igowherethetreesare:

The larvae of the Birch Sawfly, Arge pectoralis, chowing down on a leaf. Not to be confused with the Dusky Birch Sawfly, of course- their heads are black, while the Birch Sawfly has a reddish head and distinctly black legs.

clusterpod:

Sawfly larvae

clusterpod:

Sawfly larvae